Workshops

Please note that most workshops will be presented twice a day to better ensure that participants will be able to attend their preferred workshops. We will prioritize your top choices in designing your schedule.


1. Writing Down the Raw: Two educators embracing autoethnography

Presented by Lindsay Lichty and Lynne Wanamaker

This workshops is most appropriate for Early Childhood Educators and those who work with young children. 

Autoethnography “occupies an in-between space, a liminal space, a crack or fissure—an opening where the opportunity to consider human experience from a new standpoint is possible, helping build counter-narratives to the louder, noisier discourses currently in circulation in education” –Elizabeth Henderson.  In this workshop, Lynne and Lindsay will share their experiences of a Community of Practice that explores Elizabeth Henderson’s book, “Autoethnography in Early Childhood Education and Care: Narrating the Heart of Practice”.  Lindsay and Lynne will share pedagogical narrations they have written, revealing their belief that the educator’s heart is vital in early years practice.  Workshop participants will be invited to critically reflect with the narrations, and will have the opportunity to write and share within the session.

Lindsay Lichty, Early Childhood Educator, is excited to be a part of a professional community that encourages her to evolve her practice.

Lynne Wanamaker is the Early Childhood Educator in two StrongStart BC settings in British Columbia, Canada.  She feels grateful to have participated in the second phase (2011-2018) of the University of Victoria’s Investigating Quality Project, the Community Early Learning and Child Care Facilitator’s Pilot Project. 


2. Let’s Play Together : Teaching play skills to children with Autism

Presented by Shelin Husein

This workshop is most appropriate for everyone who works with, plans, or cares for young children. 

This workshop will discuss what ASD is and what its characteristics are. Shelin will explore how ASD effects the way a child will play – types of activities, stages of play development, myths and truths. She will provide answers to questions such as ‘What can we do, as educators, to support successful social and inclusive play?’, and participtants will learn strategies through examples. This workshop is an interactive lecture with some hands-on learning through group-work.

Shelin Husein is the owner/ behaviour Analyst and Clinical Counsellor at Building Blocks Behaviour Consulting & Support Services which has been operating in the Greater Victoria area since 2006. She specializes in working with children from 2-12 with ASD, ADHD, anxiety, sensory sensitivities and phobias, etc. She teaches children how to socialize, play, be included in their communities and families and  to communicate their need…but they usually teach her a whole lot more than she teaches them!


3. The Impact of Entertainment Media on Today’s Families

Presented by Shannon Husk

This workshop is most appropriate for everyone who works with, plans, or cares for young children. 

Some children, youth and adults today are not getting enough real connection because they are so focused on technology. This workshop will present multimedia-based information regarding social media, video gaming and gambling. Shannon will share common concerns about kids and technology, and also the potential benefits. There is no returning to a pre-technology era, and she will help to plan how we can best ensure that our kids are healthy, safe and connected as we navigate the world of technology together. Discussion and questions are encouraged and participants will be provided handouts with tools, suggestions and resources.

Shannon Husk works for the BC Responsible Gambling program doing prevention and treatment with people who struggle with concerns around social media, video gaming and gambling.


4. Risky Play, Friluftsliv and Hygge in Early Childhood Education

Presented by Patricia Obee

This workshop is most appropriate for everyone who works with, plans, or cares for young children. 

This workshop will present current research on risky play, outcomes of Patricia’s research in Norway, practical and economic ways to create environments rich in affordances for risky play and skills for facilitating risky play in ECEC. Additionally, insights about, and influences on, ECEC pedagogy of the Scandinavian cultural phenomenon, hygge (coziness) and friluftsliv (‘open-air-life’) will be discussed. Patricial will present practical ways in which hygge and friluftsliv can be integrated into ECE environments and practice.

Patricia Obee is a Masters’ student in the school of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria. Her research is on risky play in ECE settings. She has practical experience with early years as an ECEA, a Physical Literacy Leader, a Kid’s Yoga Teacher and as an Eco-therapist. Prior to working with children and her Masters’ program, she competed as an Olympic athlete for Canada in the sport of rowing.


5. The Revised BC Early Learning Framework

Presented by Kira Reynolds

This workshop is most appropriate for everyone who works with, plans, or cares for young children, and has an interest in early learning environments. 

The 2008 Early Learning Framework outlined an aspirational vision for early learning environments in BC. The Revised Early Learning Framework extends that vision and sets new goals for programs that serve children birth to age 8. Join us to discuss the changes, how it impacts our practice, and how to get started.    

Kira Reynolds manages the Early Learning portfolio with Ministry of Education’s Learning Division. Her team is responsible for leading the update of the revised B.C. Early Learning Framework and for designing supports that provide children with successful transitions into the school system.


6. Cultivating Relationships through PLAY

Presented by Dr. Deborah MacNamara

This workshop is most appropriate for everyone who works with, plans, or cares for young children. 

Creating a culture of play is one of the most effective ways for nourishing our relationships with each other. Whether we are dealing with the young or old, school or home, play has the power to bring us together. We will explore the power of play to foster attachment and how we can add play to our daily interactions with each other and those in our care.


7. A Playful Approach to Discipline

Presented by Dr. Deborah MacNamara

This workshop is most appropriate for everyone who works with, plans, or cares for young children. 

Play is the default mode of the young and not work, which discipline traditional represents when we are focused on getting young kids to pay attention to outcomes and consequences. If young children are built to play, then there are ways we can match our discipline to their way of being in the world.  Play makes it possible to deliver the messages of civility and to compensate for immaturity, thus buying nature some time to grow our kids up.


8. Indigenous Pedagogies

Presented by Rebecca Inoke and Kristan Nelson, Victoria Native Friendship Centre

This workshop is most appropriate for everyone who works with, plans, or cares for young children and has an interest in early learning environments. 

Engage with Rebecca and Kristan as they lead you through discussion and tools to integrate Indigenous ways of teaching and knowing for Early Years’ Environments. In her role as the Family and Cultural mentor for the
XaXe SŦELIṮḴEL Daycare, Rebecca meets with elders and wisdom keepers, bringing cultural programming to her centre. Kristan is an Aboriginal speech language pathologist and specializes in pediatric early intervention at the Victoria Native Friendship Centre. She collaborates and builds relationships in order to respond in culturally respectful and effective ways to the needs of Indigenous families.


9. Intergenerational Learning

Presented by Caroline Derksen, Sprouts Learning Academy

This workshop is most appropriate for everyone who works with, plans, or cares for young children and has an interest in early learning environments. 

Join Caroline in a discussion of Intergenerational Learning and her experience in finding ways to relationship build between Early Years’ and community elders/seniors. Her centre has established an Intergenerational Learning program, and through research and exploration of parallel programs in the Pacific Northwest, they have seen terrific results! Discover the therapeutic benefits for both children, and seniors, to establishing long-term community connections